Skip to main content

Economic Opportunity and
Jobs Programs

Greater stability and financial independence - these are the goals of the Economic Opportunity Programs offered by Seattle Housing Authority for residents who want to find jobs and advance their careers.

Staff members provide comprehensive support to help you:

  • Identify and overcome barriers to your progress
  • Zero in on your specific interests and unique skills
  • Set and work toward goals for your future.

What we do

Staff specialists help you develop a plan with specific activities and actions needed to achieve your goals. This support includes:

  • individual support to help identify your needs
  • coordination and referrals to services
  • assistance in setting goals and identifying the steps to accomplish these goals
  • ongoing support to make positive changes in your life .

Staff members speak several languages and often share the same cultures as the residents we serve. They can help bridge cultural differences and provide the support you need to reach your goals.

What services are available?

  • emergency assistance (food, utilities, rent)
  • connections to education (completing high school, getting a GED, entering college)
  • connections to employers looking for workers
  • access to jobs related to Seattle Housing Authority construction, through our "Section 3" program
  • career counseling and job training
  • assistance with self-employment
  • budgeting and financial planning
  • legal services
  • parenting skills
  • home-buyer education

Economic Opportunity Specialists are prepared and willing to help you with whatever issues are standing in the way of getting and keeping a good job.

Staff members use their experience and contacts to help participants obtain employment in many industries, including medical, personal care, office and administration, social services and building trades.

If you already have a job, you can also use our Economic Opportunity services to help you get a higher-paying job, earn a promotion or receive higher wages in your current job.

What can you expect from the program?

When you begin working with an Economic Opportunity Program staff person, you will have an ally to help you navigate the path of education and employment. Your staff person will help you to identify your skills, abilities and interests. They, they will continue to help you as you make decisions and move forward. If you need services from other organizations, they will help you make those connections.

Here are some of the activities you may work on with your Economic Opportunity Specialist:

  • improving your resume
  • learing interview skills and practicing for a job interview
  • testing to find out what you are good at
  • help in search for a job and understanding work-related issues
  • job placement help
  • on-the-job training and internship opportunities
  • assisance in keeping your job
  • help in getting higher pay and benefits

Where to go for help

There are six Economic Opportunity offices located throughout Seattle, staffed by Specialists and Job Placement staff. You can make an appointment ahead of time or just walk in.

High Point

6558 35th Ave SW, Seattle, WA 98126
206-937-3292

Lake City

12546-1/2 33rd Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98125
206-363-1471

NewHolly

7058 32nd Ave S, Seattle, WA 98118
206-760-2709

Rainier Vista

4410 29th Ave S #2, Seattle, WA 98108
206-722-4010

Yesler Terrace

825 Yesler Way, Lower Level, Seattle, WA 98104
206-344-5837

Central Office - Downtown

190 Queen Anne Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109
206-344-5837

Other Economic Opportunity Programs

Here are additional programs that can help residents gain financial stability:

Education Programs

There are a number of education and scholarship programs designed for students receiving rental assistance. More information here.

Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS)

This program is designed to help families receiving rental assistance become self-supporting. More information here.

Savings Match Program

This program is intended to assist households who are ready to leave subsidized housing, either to rent in the private market or to purchase a home. More information here.